Next Steps

Where do I begin?! Ya know that whole mentally preparing myself thing I’ve talk about? I don’t think I did enough of that this time. Or maybe we just got a lot of overwhelming information. Or maybe it gets harder and harder to send Sam off to surgery as he gets older and more aware of what’s going on. Or maybe it’s a combination of both. Or maybe sometimes I have my moments.

Sam is definitely starting to figure things out. He does just fine until everyone starts coming in to go over things. This time his anesthesiologist said he was pretty feisty when they brought him back to the operating room. Poor buddy. After looking at Sam’s history, the anesthesiologist said “Wow, he’s got quite the history. It’s v.e.r.y rare a kid makes it to three pages.” We all joked saying Sam should get a medal or trophy or something. I could have laughed or cried. I laughed. Laughing is much better for the soul.

Sam after dilation
He was super upset after surgery until he saw his mama. He fell asleep instantly, cuddled in her arms.

Trying to explain everything and making it make sense to the general public is tough. I’ll do my best.

ENT…

Because of the GI findings, Sam’s ENT has decided to stay in the background for quite a while. He wanted us to talk to Sam’s pulmonologist as he said Sam’s airway is really red and inflamed. This is likely due to Sam’s most recent illness, which is a whole other story. Thankfully, after looking at the pics, Sam’s pulmonologist wasn’t worried. The good news…the small part of Sam’s airway he fixed last month was successful!

GI…

We got answers, but not the greatest news. It’s a lot of info, but in short, his GI surgeon is going to talk to docs from Boston as they are stumped and not sure what to do next. After looking, they discovered his tummy surgery came undone or unwrapped. The surgery, last done in November of 2017, that’s failed three times now. It’s likely, the unsuccessful surgery is due to Sam’s violent retching episodes, which in turn wreak havoc on his already stressed esophagus. Either way he’ll have another open surgery sometime this summer. Open surgery…yuck. They will do some more tests and dilate his esophagus again in four weeks. The good news…he once again recovered beautifully!

Once again, we wait…patiently.

We are use to getting bad news and the unknown. Hope is hope, just that, and it’s a phenomenal thing. We cling to hope.

“We are hard pressed on every side, but not crushed; perplexed, but not in despair; persecuted, but not abandoned; struck down, but not destroyed.”
(2 Corinthians 4:8‭-‬9 NIV)

Here We Go Again

Sam will go to surgery again tomorrow (Monday). His GI surgeon and a GI doctor will stretch his esophagus again for the twenti somethingth time. His ENT will look to see if the sutures stayed intact on the bottom part of his Laryngeal Cleft, or the hole in his airway. His ENT has decided only to look and see if the surgery he did last month worked or not. Both Sam’s ENT and GI surgeons are going into this, hoping to formulate a plan based on their findings.

There are SO MANY things I could worry about with Sam. Of course, I travel down that path sometimes, but it gets me nowhere except stressed and fearful. There is SO little we can control. I know we are doing everything in our control, the rest is out of our hands. We choose to let go, and let God. When that truly happens, I can tell you from experience, the stress and fear factor quickly go away.

Pray the surgery done last month on Sam’s airway was successful. Pray for Sam’s surgeons, anesthesiologist, and anyone else caring for him. Pray Sam will recover quickly, his docs will be able to formulate a good plan, and we will get some answers. Pray for the rest of us too. I joke, Sam recovers faster than I do when he has surgery. As you can imagine, surgery days are pretty mentally and emotionally exhausting. As always, thank you for keeping us and our Superman Sam in your prayers.

When Bad News Almost Feels Like Good News

When bad news means fixable answers to questions you’ve been pondering, about your child’s health, sadly, it almost feels like good news.

I have to start by saying, we didn’t even get asked for Sam’s name when checked in at the surgery desk. I don’t think that was the first time. Many of the staff in surgery are on a first name basis with Sam. It is the most lousy and endearing feeling all in one.

Today was not so great, but it could be much worse. Sam’s ENT told us, “Most kids go one, two, and maybe three, but Sam goes one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten…”

In order for me not to write a book, I can tell you…

…Sam’s last surgery did not work. They did part of the surgery, but the rest will not get done until all the GI (tummy) stuff gets figured out.

…his esophagus needed to be dilated, AGAIN.

…they couldn’t check to see if his nissen surgery came unwrapped, which would be for the fourth time, because they weren’t able to pass the scope through. They will likely do other testing to check on this.

…we will wait to see what the biopsies tell us.

…Sam will likely get a more complicated feeding tube placed when they dilate his esophagus, AGAIN in four to six weeks.

Although there was quite a bit of heavy news, everything is fixable and that is the good news. The other good news is we were able to find answers to the elcalated retching and aspiration episodes. What’s another surgery when you’ve had more than thirty and you’re not even three years old yet?! I’m close to forty and I haven’t even had one people!

Even more good news, Sam recovered amazingly, once again. He makes anesthesia look easy. He makes surgery look easy. He makes hard stuff look easy, period. Maybe he really is Superman. He’s our Superman, that’s for sure.

“Dear brothers and sisters, when troubles of any kind come your way, consider it an opportunity for great joy.” James 1:2