Let’s Get This Over With

We leave in exactly two weeks for Cincinnati and we now have a pretty sick little boy on our hands. Even though yesterday his symptoms weren’t so bad, his pulmonologist decided to go up on all his nebs, start his antibiotic neb and have us do a trach culture. I was hoping we could wait till Monday to do the culture, mostly for selfish reasons because I have to drive the specimen to Minneapolis. Yesterday, his symptoms didn’t seem to merit a two hour trip there and back, so I thought…

The little boy who was running around yesterday morning, barfing here and there, but happy as could be, has barely moved off the couch today and is currently on oxygen to help keep him comfortable.Poor buddy.

Poor buddy.

I’m so glad we didn’t wait to do a trach culture. The results take seventy-two hours so we are hoping to stay out of the hospital and come up with a plan on Monday. Or even better, Sam kicks this thing before then.

Okay, so let’s pray he kicks whatever this is! He needs to be healthy before we go to Cincinnati. He will be put under two of the days we are there and if he doesn’t clear his pre-op appointment, our trip to Cincinnati will be postponed. Nope, not happening.

Sam went for almost two whole months symptom free! That’s pretty good for Sam in the winter! Let’s get this over with, little buddy. You’ve got this!

I believe in the power of prayer. Even if you don’t, if you would throw one out there for my sweet, little boy, we would greatly appreciate it.

As always…

…Sam Strong

and…

…Faith Over Fear!

We want this guy back!
We want this guy back!

This guy.

Cincinnati Bound

It’s official.

We will be going to Cincinnati Children’s in February. The first trip will be a series of back to back appointments and scopes. The team of doctors have gathered what they know about Sam’s history from his doctors here. Once they gather the information from our first trip, the doctors will meet again and formulate a plan for Sam. We are hoping and praying some of the plan will be able to be carried out by our doctors here. Bottom line, let’s hope they can figure out a way to get rid of Sam’s trach (breathing tube), which would be a definite game changer for Sam and our family.

Since the referral process started back in August, I have been doing my homework figuring out how we will get Sam to Cincinnati. FAA has SO many regulations. And flying with a complex child gets you no free passes. If anything, it’s the opposite. It’s been an interesting and sometimes frustrating process with a few tears shed. Okay, more than a few. I was surprised by one particular phone call I made to the airline we are flying. It was a specific number to call if you are flying with a person who has disabilities. Seems like the right number to call, right? Let’s just say, the person on the other end was not helpful and insinuated we fly first class. Yes, that was a call that ended in tears. Half the time, when I call places to ask questions, they have no idea what I’m talking about, which is not abnormal when it comes to Sam. The other day the gal who handles Sam from our insurance company told me, most of the things that have come up with Sam, we’ve never seen before so we’ve had to make it up as we go. Side note. Thank you Lord for insurance!

I’ve dived into ALL of the resources I can. I was able to connect with another mom whose daughter was trached and they traveled with her. She reassured me, there will be hiccups along the way and I will probably be sweating profusely by the time we board, but it sounds like I’m on the right track and asking the right questions. It felt good to talk to someone who’s been there. The trach mama world can be an isolating feeling. Although I have some pretty amazing friends who might not “get it” and really don’t try to, but are really good listeners.

The plane tickets are bought, the hotel is booked, and the car is rented!

The rest will get figured out with a lot of help from Sam’s respiratory therapist, nurses, and many others. So thankful for all the help!

Sam has been very healthy for the past month. Sean (my husband) would tell that’s because he hadn’t been in school. Maybe, but he LOVES school and until his docs tell us to pull him, I’ll keep sending him. Praying Sam will stay healthy until Cincinnati and will get to stay in school.

Overwhelmed

This past week was incredibly overwhelming and it wasn’t because things were bad. It was the exact opposite.

Our family and friends have had two benefits to raise money for our travel expenses to and from Cincinnati. People we don’t even know donated silent auction items or gave money to our family. Wow. I didn’t know that many people liked us. Lol.

I knew these events were happening, but I kept pretending they wouldn’t come to pass. They did. I even tried to say, “Thank you, but no thank you.” All I could think is, we don’t deserve this. There might be a lot of crud going on in our world, but I continue to be amazed at the good in people, not only now, but the past three years. I still don’t feel like we deserve any of this, but can tell you, a heavy financial weight has been definitely lifted off of our shoulders. Now, we can focus on how we will get Sam to Cincinnati logistically, not financially.

The other day, I made a huge deposit into an account I set up in Sam’s name. I stood there while the bank teller counted the money and fought back tears. I bit my bottom lip, a subconscious thing I do when I am trying to get my mind on something else. When the teller got to the checks, I did my best to wipe the tears away without anyone noticing. This is silly, I told myself, pull yourself together. Per policy, another bank teller came over to double check the checks. It was all over after that. The floodgates came. I literally sobbed like a baby. So embarrassing. My heart was so overwhelmed, I couldn’t control the tears no matter how much I tried. The teller was so sweet, sincerely asking if I was okay. I reassured her, my tears were happy tears.

If you had any part of any of these events, thank you. Our hearts are so overwhelmed with gratitude, we can barely contain it.

Sean and I came home and both agreed, the two days felt like a surgery day, which means complete exhaustion. It felt like the thoughts that linger after your wedding day. Did we acknowledge and thank everyone who came? Oh, no I didn’t even know that person was there?! Off and on, I keep having to stop the tears from coming, but again, they are happy tears.

Especially now, in a world where we are always “busy”, giving your time is a gift that doesn’t go unnoticed by the receiver. In my opinion, time is the greatest gift you can give someone. I know the time and planning that went into each of the two events on behalf of Sam was a lot. Something like that doesn’t just happen. The monetary gifts given to our family the past couple of weeks would not have been made if people did not give their time. At the end of the day, people gave their gift of time and that is worth just as much.

THANK YOU to anyone who helped in any way whether with your time or your financial contribution. Words truly cannot express our gratitude.

We found out our first travel dates to Cincinnati! We will be going at the end of February!

Sam Strong!

Cincinnati here we come!

Surgery and Then Some

Overall Sam’s surgeries went well. The second surgery was a bit more invasive than we expected, but with a few restrictions, he was back at school the next day.

Recovery has gone well for the most part. We had to keep an eye on some bleeding, but thankfully that subsided.

About a week ago he started more secretions and then retched (threw up) the entire night. After making a call to surgery, we were advised to have Sam be seen either by his pediatrician or take him to the ED (Emergency Department). In order to avoid the ED, I was on the horn at exactly 7:30 that morning as soon as the clinic opened. Sam’s pediatrician wasn’t there, but we were able to see another pediatrician who also sees complex kids. So glad we were able to avoid the ED.

A small recap that morning…

Get the report from the night nurse on Sam’s night after we finally got him to sleep again around 3:00am. Check the discharge paperwork to see the section on, “When to Call the Doctor”. Call the doctor. Bummer…the doctor said to get him into his pediatrician or if were not able, go to the ED. Give the report to the day nurse coming on. Oh yeah, a new nurse is training today. Great day for that. Oh well, it will be good experience for her. Try to keep a smile on my face as introduce myself to the new nurse and hopefully make her feel welcomed. Wake Will and Abby up for school. Make lunches. Eventually tell Will he’ll have to wear dirty socks to school after he, to no avail searched for clean ones. Take Will and Abby to school. Take a shower. Throw in a load of laundry. Run to the store to get Pedialyte since Sam couldn’t tolerate his formula overnight. Throw the load of laundry in the dryer. Double check we have all five bags. Buckle Sam in his carseat. Whew! All that in only a few hours! Only twelve minutes later than when we wanted to leave! We did it! Nice work ladies!

Seeing someone who doesn’t know Sam was a bit interesting. After some discussion and me giving the pediatrician a very small dose of Sam’s medical history, he checked out Sam’s surgery area. I knew as soon as he started fumbling over his words, he was concerned. He danced around his words until I stepped in and helped him finish what he was trying to say, “So, you think we need to get an ultrasound.” He shook his head saying yes. His concern was on the left side. Sometimes I wish there could be something in Sam’s charts that could forewarn medical personnel not to sugar coat things for me. It’s been over the three years now and I know when doctors are giving concerning or difficult news. I wish something said, “She can handle the hard stuff and won’t freak out. Give it to her straight.”

Surgery met us in the ultrasound room. Knowing Sam well and his history from the beginning, she was ear to ear smiles to see how well Sam was doing overall. She also had a good chuckle when the ultrasound tech shared there was a hematoma on the left side which wasn’t too concerning, but there was a small hernia on the ride side. The reason surgery had a chuckle is because she thought it was a classic Sam move to have a little twist in his story.

At the end of the day, the retching was likely related to a cold Sam was brewing, which I also had to explain to the pediatrician after the ultrasound. I reassured him the throwing up wasn’t something we would have brought Sam in for otherwise. We brought Sam because it was so close to surgery and they wanted to be sure the retching wasn’t surgery related. I explained the retching is unfortunately the nature of Sam when he gets a cold.

With an extra boost of nebs, or twelve nebulizer treatments, four times a day, Sam seems to have fought off the cold. Thank goodness!

Nurses Week

images

This is a shout out to all the nurses out there who I know, first hand, don’t have time to play cards, don’t always get a lunch break, and sometimes go for long periods of time without a bathroom break.

They are the best.

Without nurses, we wouldn’t be able to live a somewhat normal life. When someone mistakes Sam’s nurses for a babysitter, I think his nurses would agree, they are far from that. Most importantly, in the event something goes wrong, they are qualified to save my son’s life and care for his daily needs that are far different than a typical child.

A typical morning for Sam…

The cords. Every morning we spend some time unraveling Sam from his pulse oximeter and feeding tube. Then it’s routine g-tube and trach cares, getting his vitals (temp, respiratory rate, pulse rate, and sometimes a blood pressure) knowing how to draw up his daily meds, know what to give and in what order to give them in, and know whether the meds should go in his “g” or “j”. It’s knowing how to prime a feeding pump, get it started, and know how much formula should be given in the “g” and the “j” throughout the day. It’s knowing how many bolus’ to give and how fast or slow to go. It’s knowing what nebs to give and in what order to give them in. That’s only the very beginning of Sam’s day. Let’s not forget the equipment, med, supply, etc. checks the nurses are still required to do daily. I could probably go into more detail, but you get the point. We are incredibly thankful for nurses!

Sometimes I think that’s why we have these holidays or appreciation weeks. They are just made up, money making weeks/days to show recognition for the people in our lives we should already be appreciating. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not completely against all these weeks/days. It’s also fun to have a reason to spoil these special people in our lives. I’m thankful to live in a place I get that opportunity.

If you have nurses in your life, make sure to thank them for the work they do that often goes unappreciated.

Next Steps

Where do I begin?! Ya know that whole mentally preparing myself thing I’ve talk about? I don’t think I did enough of that this time. Or maybe we just got a lot of overwhelming information. Or maybe it gets harder and harder to send Sam off to surgery as he gets older and more aware of what’s going on. Or maybe it’s a combination of both. Or maybe sometimes I have my moments.

Sam is definitely starting to figure things out. He does just fine until everyone starts coming in to go over things. This time his anesthesiologist said he was pretty feisty when they brought him back to the operating room. Poor buddy. After looking at Sam’s history, the anesthesiologist said “Wow, he’s got quite the history. It’s v.e.r.y rare a kid makes it to three pages.” We all joked saying Sam should get a medal or trophy or something. I could have laughed or cried. I laughed. Laughing is much better for the soul.

Sam after dilation
He was super upset after surgery until he saw his mama. He fell asleep instantly, cuddled in her arms.

Trying to explain everything and making it make sense to the general public is tough. I’ll do my best.

ENT…

Because of the GI findings, Sam’s ENT has decided to stay in the background for quite a while. He wanted us to talk to Sam’s pulmonologist as he said Sam’s airway is really red and inflamed. This is likely due to Sam’s most recent illness, which is a whole other story. Thankfully, after looking at the pics, Sam’s pulmonologist wasn’t worried. The good news…the small part of Sam’s airway he fixed last month was successful!

GI…

We got answers, but not the greatest news. It’s a lot of info, but in short, his GI surgeon is going to talk to docs from Boston as they are stumped and not sure what to do next. After looking, they discovered his tummy surgery came undone or unwrapped. The surgery, last done in November of 2017, that’s failed three times now. It’s likely, the unsuccessful surgery is due to Sam’s violent retching episodes, which in turn wreak havoc on his already stressed esophagus. Either way he’ll have another open surgery sometime this summer. Open surgery…yuck. They will do some more tests and dilate his esophagus again in four weeks. The good news…he once again recovered beautifully!

Once again, we wait…patiently.

We are use to getting bad news and the unknown. Hope is hope, just that, and it’s a phenomenal thing. We cling to hope.

“We are hard pressed on every side, but not crushed; perplexed, but not in despair; persecuted, but not abandoned; struck down, but not destroyed.”
(2 Corinthians 4:8‭-‬9 NIV)

Here We Go Again

Sam will go to surgery again tomorrow (Monday). His GI surgeon and a GI doctor will stretch his esophagus again for the twenti somethingth time. His ENT will look to see if the sutures stayed intact on the bottom part of his Laryngeal Cleft, or the hole in his airway. His ENT has decided only to look and see if the surgery he did last month worked or not. Both Sam’s ENT and GI surgeons are going into this, hoping to formulate a plan based on their findings.

There are SO MANY things I could worry about with Sam. Of course, I travel down that path sometimes, but it gets me nowhere except stressed and fearful. There is SO little we can control. I know we are doing everything in our control, the rest is out of our hands. We choose to let go, and let God. When that truly happens, I can tell you from experience, the stress and fear factor quickly go away.

Pray the surgery done last month on Sam’s airway was successful. Pray for Sam’s surgeons, anesthesiologist, and anyone else caring for him. Pray Sam will recover quickly, his docs will be able to formulate a good plan, and we will get some answers. Pray for the rest of us too. I joke, Sam recovers faster than I do when he has surgery. As you can imagine, surgery days are pretty mentally and emotionally exhausting. As always, thank you for keeping us and our Superman Sam in your prayers.

Pseudomonas

Well, it’s been a bit since my last post. If you can imagine, life gets a little busy juggling a complex child and three other kids. Not too long ago, someone bought me a journal. The cover reads, “There are no ordinary days.” So true, for all of us, really. Although, if I’m being completely honest, I can think of countless ordinary days before Sam. When I talk about my ordinary days to my close people, they would tell you my days are not so ordinary. I’m okay with that. We usually laugh and I say, “You can’t make this stuff up!” Laughter, for sure, is the best medicine. Thank you to my besties for listening about my not so ordinary days. I couldn’t do this journey without you.

We did end up having to spend Sam’s anniversary in the hospital, but thankfully we did not get admitted. It couldn’t have been more than an hour after I posted my last post, we were instructed to take Sam in. Bummer. He was a pretty sick little guy. Poor buddy. Although, it was the fastest trip to the Children’s ER we’ve ever had. Like any of our ER visits, they did blood work, a trach culture, and x-rays. Round trip, it was only five hours. That’s record time!  The nurse in the ER congratulated Sam on his anniversary. We all laughed, agreeing he had to pay a visit to his alma mater for his anniversary. Laughter, the best medicine.

Okay, so how many of you Googled that one? Pseudomonas? It is the type of infection or type of tracheitis Sam had growing on his trach culture. It’s not the first time Sam’s had it. It’s a scary one and we do everything on our part to keep it away from Sam, but unfortunately there’s only so much we can do. It’s not something us normal people have to worry about. You’d have to have an artificial airway, like Sam, or an open burn wound, or be in a hospital hooked up to a bunch of stuff. Thankfully, we were able to treat it this time and once we knew what it was, we were able to treat it quickly.

I’d like to say things have been going really well for Sam since then. Let’s just say, we’ve had an eventful February. Sam’s has some GI stuff going on. Pray we can get it figured out and get him back on track, or at least back on “his” track.

There’s no doubt, this kid keeps all of us on our toes!

Sam’s been walking since November and I’ve been meaning to post a video since then. Here it finally is! Click here to see Sam walk!

Sam strong!

Sam Update

Sam continues to keep all of us on our toes, but he’s had a really good, very healthy, last couple of months.

We did have one trip to the Children’s ER in November, but that’s only because we don’t have any other place to go. Sam decided to eat the heck out of a purple colored pencil, yes folks, a colored pencil. You don’t eat food, but you’ll gnaw on a colored pencil?! My thoughts exactly. I had no idea he was even chewing on anything. He was standing in front of the TV, watching who knows what. He coughed. Like normal, I went to suction him. Oh boy!!! Purple colored pencil everywhere! And then the scary part. Purple was literally spilling out of his trach. Not good folks! I had to suction him a good ten to fifteen times before his secretions were clear again. Kinda gross, I know. There were actually small specks of purple colored pencil in the suction tubing. Oh great. My first thought, aspiration pneumonia. After we finally suctioned all of the purple out, Mr. Superman went about his normal mischievous behavior acting as if nothing had even happened.

I went to bed mentally preparing myself it could be a long night. Nope. He slept great and showed no signs of aspiration pneumonia. Whew. It wasn’t until his speech pathologist at feeding clinic reminded us of the three day a week antibiotic Sam is on, which has been a God send for Sam this past year, that it dawned on us. Oh yeah, it’s highly likely the antibiotic kicked anything that may have tried to brew. Thank goodness. Aspiration pneumonia is not pretty.

The next day, I wasn’t worried at all. One thing I’ve learned about aspiration pneumonia is it comes on very quickly. Sam’s doctor still wanted him to be observed and x-rays done to be safe; hence, a very long, eight hour trip to the Children’s ER. It felt a little silly to me, but I can’t complain about an overly cautious doctor, right?! No, we are incredibly thankful for this doctor who has saved Sam’s life more than once.

Feeding therapy…

We’ve been going to feeding clinic for a couple of months now. This is a new, scary, and fun thing for us because it’s the first therapy we’ve been able to do outside our house. For the past two years, all the therapies have come to us, which has been and still is, awesome. Although there’s something about taking your baby, yes, I know he’s a toddler now, just let me have my moment, out in public. Sam is so darn friendly, waving at every person who walks by him. I feel like I have to say hi to people for him since he doesn’t have a voice. Most the time he’s just waving and no one sees him. Once they do, they can’t resist his sweet smile and the big, “Hello, I’m Sam.”, wave. Okay, okay, onto feeding clinic.

Although, he has a long way to go, he has made a lot of progress. In the past, even when Sam would touch different foods, he would instantly gag. Up until a couple of months ago, if food even came near his mouth, he would gag and end up needing lots of suctioning. Now, he rarely gags. In order for Sam to even be able to do a swallow study, he has to be able to drink an entire med cup (like the cup you get when you buy children’s ibuprofen or Tylenol) of a thickened liquid. Let’s just say, although he’s come a long way, he’s not even close to that. He’ll get there!

Because of the aspiration episode, Sam’s ENT has decided to do an endoscopy instead of waiting until he is able to do a swallow study. It’s kind of a bummer because it’s another sedation for Sam, but it will give us a concrete answer if the last surgery worked or not. It will tell us if the hole in Sam’s airway has been repaired.

Two years ago today, we brought Sam home with us for the very first time after living in the hospital for seven months. The word that comes to mind from two years ago…terrifying. I remember thinking… There’s no code blue button at home. There’s no button to push where thirty something people will immediately rush into Sam’s room and save his life. His life is now in our hands. I am not a doctor. I am not a nurse. I am just a mama, but we’ve got this. When Sam was seven months old, developmentally he was like a newborn. He couldn’t lift his head on his own and only moved his arms legs. Most didn’t think Sam would make it out of that hospital. Not only did he make it home, he’s thriving! He is now walking! He’s actually been walking since the end of November, but I realized I never posted this super exciting milestone. A milestone two years ago, that was not promising.

That was a bit long winded!

I guess I shouldn’t have bragged how healthy Sam has been. I’ve been working on this post the past few weeks or so, excited to publish it on his anniversary. And now, I’m sitting here, sleep deprived, with a very sick little boy, hoping and praying we don’t have to spend his anniversary in the hospital.