Dilation #5 Update

I suppose no news is good news, right? For the most part, yes.

Sam’s dilation went very well. His esophagus was very narrow, but not as narrow as the last time he got dilated. Good news!

Again, we wait. If symptoms begin, we call surgery and they get Sam on the schedule. Generally, his symptoms consist of retching (throwing up), which start to become more frequent and violent as time goes on. Eventually, he’s not able to control his secretions, so he spits a lot too. Basically, he still creates secretions (spit), but if his esophagus is narrow enough or closed, there is no other place for the secretions to go except out his mouth. This makes for a very nauseous little boy. Poor guy.

After Sam’s dilation, his surgeon discussed WHEN Sam is able to go three months without a dilation, then he’ll plan to get Sam on the schedule to look at his esophagus. If things look good and open, we wait again. When Sam can go for at least six months without a dilation then his surgeon will feel good about us planning another trip to Cincinnati to hopefully get his airway fixed.

Sam also had a granuloma cauterized or how I like to make it more visual for you, the extra skin on the hole in his throat, sizzled off by a fire pen. This went well too. Although, it was a lot to look at after. For the next week or so, we cleaned gross puss and what looked like black soot around his trach site. Yuck and again, poor guy! Thankfully, it all healed very nicely.

The day after Sam’s dilation he seemed like he was recovering well. When he woke up the next morning, things went south very quickly. He ended up with a tracheitis. He had a couple of very rough days. We were able to catch this right away and treat the nasty, airway bacterial infection. Along with our hard work and the antibiotic nebs, like magic, Sam was back to his lively self in no time. Thank you for home care nurses!

Except for the spitting. No, not another thing, little buddy. His demeanor was back to his norm, but he wouldn’t swallow his secretions. Per Surgery we should bring him in to be evaluated in the next couple of days, unless things got worse, which for Sam means going to the ED (Emergency Department). Not the dreaded ED. Besides him not swallowing his secretions, he seems totally fine. Sometimes I wish they had another place for complex kids to go in these situations.

The next day, after talking with Sam’s Pulmonologist, she too thought he should be evaluated. Bummer.

We had planned to take him in early the next morning, knowing the less busy times of the ED. Sam had different plans. Good plans! When he woke up, the spitting had stopped!!! Thank you Lord!!!

Sam has been back to his spunky self, continuing to teach us what life is all about.

Sam Strong!

Faith Over Fear!

Dilation #5

Sam will have another dilation tomorrow. Yes, he’s had WAY more than five dilations, but I started the count over after his last major surgery. We are hoping and praying he won’t need as many as the first time around.

In the four plus years, Sam’s had a trach (breathing tube) and feeding tube, he hasn’t had to have a granuloma cauterized (burned off), which is pretty good. This is basically skin starting to grow where it shouldn’t. Before the dilation, he’ll have a tracheal granuloma cauterized. Typically, this can be done in the clinic, but Sam’s ENT thought it would be better for Sam under anesthesia, also knowing he could do it alongside one of Sam’s dilations. We were very thankful for this. Sam’s nurse and I were not looking forward to having to hold him down for that procedure!!

We are also thankful, Sam will get his feeding tube changed in surgery tomorrow. As I’ve said before, this is a procedure he gets done routinely every two to three months. It now takes three, sometimes four of us to hold Sam down. As soon as he sees an x-ray table now, his little body clenches me with fear. We have to literally peel him off of me, to get him on to the table. It’s a fairly quick procedure, but I’m sweating by the time it’s over. Sam’s one tough cookie, so when he’s sobbing hysterically throughout the procedure, we know it must be painful.

We are thankful to be able to knock out three procedures in one tomorrow!

We’ll take some extra prayers tomorrow for Sam’s Surgeon, ENT, and anesthesia team. Pray for a smooth and quick recovery.

Sam Strong!

Faith Over Fear!

A Solid Two Days

I’m happy to report, Sam’s had two great days in a row! Sam is back to swooning all who enter the room. The rough days were due to ANOTHER infection brewing. Ugh. Darn hospitals. Thankfully, we caught and treated it quickly.

The bleeding is less. Although there is still differing of opinions on where the blood might be coming from, it’s not a huge concern right now. They are watching his hemoglobin levels, which have been overall good. If the blood continues, he will be simultaneously scoped by Pulmonology, ENT, GI, and Surgery, which we can come back for.

They have been able to control his blood pressure, with meds we can go home on, and he has been pooping. Today, for the first time in almost six weeks, he did not have any retching episodes! All good things!

The Care Conference could not have gone any better. It’s a bit emotionally overwhelming to sit in a room with several people who have played a role in saving Sam’s life the past four years. We have a good, solid plan that everyone was able to agree on. The tears were unavoidable as they thanked me for the role we’ve played at home, in caring for Sam. When they say, it takes a village, that might be an understatement when it comes to Sam.

I decided to save the best news for last. Drum roll, please. If Sam “follows the rules”, we’ll be home this weekend without the PICC line! Hallelujah!

Sam Strong!

Faith Over Fear!

Sam…

I’m going to spare you the many details of the last few days. Sam did have his dilation, and again, it was needed. Since then, there have been new reasons to keep everyone on their toes around here. I’ve had more than a few doctors and specialists tell me, they were pretty worried yesterday.

Today was a better day. Period. End of sentence.

Pray they will be able to figure out the source of the bleeding, or let’s believe it will stop all together. Pray for Sam to poop. 💩 Pray for his blood pressure. Pray for everyone who is on Sam’s care team and that they will all be able to make it to his Care Conference they are working on setting up.

Enough about that.

Right now, I am thankful for…

…Sam having a better day.

…doctors who lose sleep over my son.

…nurses who advocate for my son.

…being able to see my daughter yesterday.

…a family who continues to support us in so many different ways.

…being able to see my husband today.

…friends, who I know I can lean on.

…Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, and Music Therspy in the hospital.

…the Ronald McDonald House Charity.

…all of you who continue to pray for Sam and the rest of my family.

Okay, okay, I’ll stop.

Faith Over Fear!

Sam Strong!

Peace Even When…

On top of everything else going on, Sam developed a cold. Poor buddy can’t catch a break. It has been a rough few days. Who am I kidding, it’s been a rough thirty-two days. To be on the safe side, they did a nasal swab and trach culture. The only infection that showed is rhinovirus, aka, the common cold. Big deal, you might be thinking. At least that’s what I thought/think when my other kids caught/catch a cold.

For Sam, the common cold is rough. He’s miserable. We are constantly suctioning his trach (breathing tube). He retches a lot more because it’s hard for him to control all the extra secretions. He is also at a much greater risk for aspiration, pneumonia, and/or bronchitis. That’s where the hard work comes in for us. With continuous monitoring and safe suctioning, we can prevent these infections. Thankfully, he usually gets through the cold without complications, but it’s not easy.

Sam’s next dilation is scheduled for tomorrow at 2:45pm. As of now, he’s still scheduled. The doctors today, said if things get worse, he will have to get rescheduled. Pray for a quiet, restful night, for the cold to be short lived, and for him to be healthy enough for surgery.

Unfortunately, we are still suctioning blood from his trach. In the morning, ENT will do another bronchoscopy. This way, if they find anything, they can take care of it in surgery tomorrow afternoon.

On a good note, he is up to sixteen milliliters per hour with his feeds and we have not had to stop them!

Although this is hard, and trust me, I have my moments, for the most part, I am okay. Even in all this chaos, I am at peace. I truly believe, the more you lean on and trust in Him, the more you will feel an overwhelming peace even in the chaos.

An Answer, With…

an easy fix! Thank you Lord!!

Sam needed a dilation. This is what we were all hoping for and the best case scenario. His esophagus was pretty much shut. A thing Sam likes to do after surgeries and in general. They didn’t dilate all the way being only three weeks post-op. Later, when he heals more, if he needs another one, we can come back for that. And that, is a one day ordeal, which is something we are accustomed to in our world.

He will rest tonight and we will slowly introduce feeds tomorrow. If all goes well, we will be here a bit longer, but will get to leave the PICC line here. Please, let us leave the PICC line here, Lord. Being on “PICC line watch” is really hard and especially hard with very busy little boy.

We also figured out why the blood is coming from his trach (breathing tube)! This morning, before surgery, ENT did a bronchoscopy. The blood is from suctioning past his breathing tube, something that shouldn’t be done too much. His airway is irritated, but it will heal.

Believing for no more surprises and the feeds to go well.

Thank you again for your prayers! Keep em’ coming!

Faith Over Fear!

Sam Strong!

Surgery Jitters

It’s now been over fifty times.

Over fifty times his little body has been put under anesthesia. Over fifty times needles, scalpels, scopes, and more have messed with his insides and outside. Over fifty times of watching my little boy slowly roll away on a hospital bed.

Just because we have done it over fifty times, doesn’t mean it gets any easier. If anything, it gets harder. The older Sam gets, the more aware he becomes of what’s going to happen. He’s a smart little boy, knows the routine, and knows it’s not going to feel good. That whole white coat syndrome you hear about, it’s a thing.

This happy little guy has been through so much. He probably won’t remember all of it, but this mama and daddy’s hearts do and will.

We can worry or trust God, but we can’t do both. We choose to trust in a God we believe has a perfect plan for Sam.

Pray for our little Superman on Wednesday. Pray for our surgery jitters. Pray for the surgeons hands, for his anesthesia team, and all the other medical staff who will be involved. Pray Sam doesn’t throw any curve balls, as he’s unfortunately infamous for. Pray for a smooth and quick recovery.

Sam Strong!

Faith Over Fear!

Cincinnati Called Today

I was thrown very off guard this morning when Cincinnati called to schedule Sam’s next surgery.

“Does July 23rd work for you?” she asked. I was thrown even more off guard! Does she know we live in MN? Does she know my son is trached?

“Yes I think it will work. We will make it work.” I responded.

Right now we’re processing. There’s a lot to think about and do in a very short amount of time. It’s exciting and nerve racking all in one.

We’ll figure it out.

We’ll get it done.

Sam Strong!

Faith Over Fear!

Cincinnati Days #4-6

We are home, exhausted, and we successfully traveled with Sam! I don’t know if I’m quite ready to travel with him for fun, but I’ll get there.

Do you want to hear the good news or bad news first? I’d love to tell you there isn’t any bad news, but then I’d be lying.

Bad news…

On Tuesday, Sam was put under for a chest CT scan. He bounced back quickly from the anesthesia like normal. Later in the day we met with a pulmonologist and a gastroenterologist. The pulmonologist had a few areas of concern from the CT scan. She reassured us, she would look further into her concerns when she was able to see better with a scope the next day. Both doctors asked a lot questions, gathering even more information than they had already received from Sam’s docs at home.

On Wednesday, Sam had a triple scope. Skip this next part of you don’t care what a triple scope is.

The scopes/OR procedure we will do are called a flexible bronchoscopy (bronch), MLB (microlaryngoscopy bronchoscopy) and EGD (esophagograstroduodenoscopy).  We often refer to this as triple scopes. The bronch is with pulmonary and the physician uses a small flexible tube with a camera on the end to examine the upper airway, with a primary focus on the lungs. The MLB is with ENT using a small rigid instrument with a camera on the end to examine the upper airway to the level of the carina (which is where the lungs branch of left and right). The EGD is GI’s scope where they use a small tube with a camera on the end to examine the esophagus (throat), into the stomach, and the top part of the small intestine called the duodenum.

Cincinnati Children’s
Anesthesia is no big deal for me.

Sam had a harder recovery, but was put under the day before and had a lot more done with the scopes. They also dilated two parts of his esophagus. He bounced back by the end of the day.

Cincinnati
My mom’s glasses are much cuter on me. Oh, and I had a minor surgery today.

After the scopes and dilations were done,  the ENT, pulmonologist, and gastroenterologist came out to give us A LOT of information. Some old news and some new. We didn’t get the hopeful news we were expecting, and we learned things about Sam we had never known before. I wish I could say the new stuff was good, but it wasn’t.

We know Sam’s trach is not coming out anytime soon and we will be making several more trips to Cincinnati.

When we left the hospital on Monday, we left thinking Sam’s trach would never come out. It’s not the end of the world, but it is a bummer when that was our expectation.

Good news…

On Wednesday, after Sam’s scopes, the same doctor from Monday gave us a little more hope. I kept asking him if there was a chance the trach could come out someday. He gave the same gentle response each time, “We have a lot of work to do before we get there.”
We prayed for answers and I would say we certainly got many.

We were definitely at the right place. Sam’s perfect imperfections are their specialty, no doubt.

Is this hard? Yes, but there are tougher things in life. At the end of the day, we have a little boy who is well worth it all. Through it all, he continues to amaze us, and everyone around him, with his strength, courage, and so much more.

The team of doctors will meet this week to discuss a plan for Sam based on his history and their own findings. We will wait patiently to see what the next steps will be.

Next Steps

Where do I begin?! Ya know that whole mentally preparing myself thing I’ve talk about? I don’t think I did enough of that this time. Or maybe we just got a lot of overwhelming information. Or maybe it gets harder and harder to send Sam off to surgery as he gets older and more aware of what’s going on. Or maybe it’s a combination of both. Or maybe sometimes I have my moments.

Sam is definitely starting to figure things out. He does just fine until everyone starts coming in to go over things. This time his anesthesiologist said he was pretty feisty when they brought him back to the operating room. Poor buddy. After looking at Sam’s history, the anesthesiologist said “Wow, he’s got quite the history. It’s v.e.r.y rare a kid makes it to three pages.” We all joked saying Sam should get a medal or trophy or something. I could have laughed or cried. I laughed. Laughing is much better for the soul.

Sam after dilation
He was super upset after surgery until he saw his mama. He fell asleep instantly, cuddled in her arms.

Trying to explain everything and making it make sense to the general public is tough. I’ll do my best.

ENT…

Because of the GI findings, Sam’s ENT has decided to stay in the background for quite a while. He wanted us to talk to Sam’s pulmonologist as he said Sam’s airway is really red and inflamed. This is likely due to Sam’s most recent illness, which is a whole other story. Thankfully, after looking at the pics, Sam’s pulmonologist wasn’t worried. The good news…the small part of Sam’s airway he fixed last month was successful!

GI…

We got answers, but not the greatest news. It’s a lot of info, but in short, his GI surgeon is going to talk to docs from Boston as they are stumped and not sure what to do next. After looking, they discovered his tummy surgery came undone or unwrapped. The surgery, last done in November of 2017, that’s failed three times now. It’s likely, the unsuccessful surgery is due to Sam’s violent retching episodes, which in turn wreak havoc on his already stressed esophagus. Either way he’ll have another open surgery sometime this summer. Open surgery…yuck. They will do some more tests and dilate his esophagus again in four weeks. The good news…he once again recovered beautifully!

Once again, we wait…patiently.

We are use to getting bad news and the unknown. Hope is hope, just that, and it’s a phenomenal thing. We cling to hope.

“We are hard pressed on every side, but not crushed; perplexed, but not in despair; persecuted, but not abandoned; struck down, but not destroyed.”
(2 Corinthians 4:8‭-‬9 NIV)